PATHWAY / POLKU 22.2.–26.5.2013

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Exhibition history 2010-2014
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Pathway – the dialogue on the northern issues, nature, the life and the changes taking place in the North. The exhibition links art and the social discussion together. The invited artists come from Finland, Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Greenland and Russia.

Rovaniemi Art Museum is one of the northernmost art museums in world. Rovaniemi Art Museum sets its main focus on contemporary northern and arctic art. There have been happened many economical changes in the North. During the last few years interest in northern and arctic areas has increased. In most cases perspectives have been geopolitical or scientific but interest to the history and culture of the North has increased, too. Pathway – a dialogue on Northern Issues –exhibition takes part to the discussion.

Pathway – a Dialogue on Northern Issues tells us about the northern nature, life in the North and the changes taking place in the North. The contents of the Pathway project is based on the North and its roots, stories, rapid cultural changes and the challenges that the northern people come across today. The artists are invited to this exhibition from Finland, Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Greenland and Russia. The curators of the exhibition are visual artist Patrick Huse from Norway and Riitta Kuusikko, curator of Rovaniemi Art Museum.

Jessie Kleeman and Julie Edel Hardenberg come from Greenland, Hrafnkell Sigurdsson and Rúrí from Iceland, Kristin Tårnesvik and Ståle Blæsterdalen from Norway, Anna Widén and Katarina Pirak Sikku from Sweden, Aleksander Kozhin from Russia and Markku Heikkilä and Kaija Kiuru from Finland.

The Greenlandic artists work widely at the field of art, as visual artists and in both literature and performing art. Jessie Kleeman can be considered as a pioneer of contemporary art in Greenland. She combines the traditions of the Inuits with the present Greenlandic themes. A woman’s status in the modern society is often in focus in her art works. Julie Edel Hardenberg brings a series of film posters which at the first sight seem to be Hollywood- style images. After a closer look the question is about something fully different, imaginary stories where ordinary people become the heroes of life.

Rúrí’s installation Future Cartography takes a stand in the climate change. In the maps she points out the views of future, the influences of warming climate and melting ice masses. The visually beautiful images tell a rugged story about human influence on earth destruction. With her art works, also Kaija Kiuru tells us about the balance or disturbance between man and nature. Ecological issues and local themes are important to her. She combines different materials in a surprising way. Anna Widen uses materials from nature. Gathered from nature, the materials get new meanings in her art. In the museum, the trees taken from nature arise questions about man’s dominance over nature, for man, is nature only a resource to be exploited.

Kristin Tårnesvik debates on popular culture, cultural clichés and national issues. She works often witHrafnkell Sigurdsson brings a video work to the exhibition where a run on a water slide gets deeper consequences. He shares the experience of an exciting trip with the viewer. He talks about a journey as a ritual experience and compares our urban time travelling with the wanderings of our forefathers.h archive files. She combines different materials, e.g. photos and texts. Katarina Pirak Sikku, the other Sami artist, gets her themes from the history of her family, the Sami traditions and the spacious fell landscape. Often her art works are very political.

Ståle Blæsterdalen finds his inspiration from the northern nature, light and seasons. His poetic images bring our thoughts back to the past, to primordial, time lost. The meeting of conscious doing and spontaneity is important for Markku Heikkilä. In his art works, he returns back to the landscapes of his childhood in the valley of the Tornionjoki River. The river banks, the calm river, cows on the river meadows and the sound world of his childhood are projected in his art works. The art of Aleksander Kozhin looks far away to the past, to the philosophers of antiquity. His abstract paintings tell about time, the fleeting moments of the night or the weak gleam of light in the darkness. Hrafnkell Sigurdsson brings a video work to the exhibition where a run on a water slide gets deeper consequences. He shares the experience of an exciting trip with the viewer. He talks about a journey as a ritual experience and compares our urban time travelling with the wanderings of our forefathers.

After Rovaniemi the exhibition will take place at Oulu Art Museum. Photogalleries below:



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